Michael Graves

* 1934

American architect, one of the New York Five, a group of five New York City architects (Peter Eisenman, Michael Graves, Charles Gwathmey, John Hejduk and Richard Meier) whose photographed work was the subject of a CASE (Committee of Architects for the Study of the Environment) meeting at the Museum of Modern Art, organized by Arthur Drexler and Colin Rowe in 1969, and featured in the subsequent book Five Architects, published by Wittenborn in 1972, then more famously by Oxford Press in 1975.

project list


2004 RIVERWALK 2, NISHINIPPON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DESIGN SCHOOL, Kitakyushu
2001 FUKUOKA OFFICE BUILDING, Fukuoka
2000 FAMILLE TSUKISHIMA APARTMENT BUILDING, Tokyo
1998 BRISTOL/SAVOY TOWERS (TEN GOOD CITY), Fukuoka
1997 FUKUOKA OFFICE BUILDING, Fukuoka
1993 NEXUS MOMOCHI RESIDENTIAL TOWER, Fukuoka
1992
ARTE YOKOHAMA, Yokohama city, Kanagawa
1991 NTT HEADQUARTERS, Tokyo
1990 FUKUOKA HYATT HOTEL AND OFFICE BUILDING, Fukuoka
KASUMI RESEARCH AND TRAINING CENTRE, Tsukaba
OJUKU TOWN HALL, Onjuku
1988 TAJIMA OFFICE BUILDING, Tokyo
1986
SHIISEIDO HEALTH CLUB, Tokyo

 

quotes about Michael Graves


"One year later, a very interesting meeting occurred between Japanese and Western architects in a Japanese temple. The Western architects consisted of a handful of deconstructivists – and Michael Graves.  Unfortunately, the talk was about chaos. It was obvious that most of the Western architects were interested in chaos, and that their work was partly based on chaos. But these Westerners were then confronted with the Japanese, who were in a very chauvinistic and proud mood, and who for once were not worried about imitation; they boasted that Japan has real chaos, while in the West it is only a simulation. And it became clear that in their work chaos had already become a style, a theme. Then Michael Graves made his presentation, consisting of many Michael Graves projects in Japan. He talked about humanism, order, and the public realm. The paradox is that Michael Graves may have had more projects built in Japan than any of the Japanese architects in the room. And what this may mean is that the Japanese client does not like chaos. Maybe Japanese clients want humanism, and that is why they go to foreign architects. Maybe Japanese clients do not like the chaos of the Japanese city and instead want to have order. Maybe, in spite of what Western intellectuals like in Japan, Japanese mayors want streets geared toward pedestrians. Maybe there is an incredible gulf between what we consider the real Japan and the true ambitions of Japanese culture." (Rem Koolhaas)